D.K. Pan and NKO, The 66 Ways of Water Magic, The Long Walk, 2011. Photo: Eli Brownell, King County Parks
D.K. Pan and NKO were commissioned by Susan Robb to create artwork for The Long Walk. D.K. and NKO have collaborated on numerous creative endeavors including co-founding the Free Sheep Foundation. For this project, they presented “The 66 Ways of Water Magic” which involved a limited edition of 66 hand-screen-printed, monotype t-shirts emblazoned with the text “Time Is Memory” (in water-based ink). The shirts were packaged along with a water bottle and hand-labeled. Each Long Walker was presented with the object as a gift, wherein the name on the package was not their own. The instructions were for the participants to bear the gifts and engage in a water ritual with the recipient in order to complete the offering process. To give the gift, one had to receive it first, creating a sequential order based on randomness. The water rituals throughout The Long Walk involved songs and dance, feet and hand washings, and shared moments both private and public. The objects existed as an artifact of the ritual, underlying the aggregated system of understanding which increased with shared activity.


Just found this image from Long Walk last summer…

D.K. Pan and NKO, The 66 Ways of Water Magic, The Long Walk, 2011. Photo: Eli Brownell, King County Parks

D.K. Pan and NKO were commissioned by Susan Robb to create artwork for The Long Walk. D.K. and NKO have collaborated on numerous creative endeavors including co-founding the Free Sheep Foundation. For this project, they presented “The 66 Ways of Water Magic” which involved a limited edition of 66 hand-screen-printed, monotype t-shirts emblazoned with the text “Time Is Memory” (in water-based ink). The shirts were packaged along with a water bottle and hand-labeled. Each Long Walker was presented with the object as a gift, wherein the name on the package was not their own. The instructions were for the participants to bear the gifts and engage in a water ritual with the recipient in order to complete the offering process. To give the gift, one had to receive it first, creating a sequential order based on randomness. The water rituals throughout The Long Walk involved songs and dance, feet and hand washings, and shared moments both private and public. The objects existed as an artifact of the ritual, underlying the aggregated system of understanding which increased with shared activity.
Just found this image from Long Walk last summer…
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